Livres et rapports

Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology
Postman, N. (1992)

In this witty, often terrifying work of cultural criticism, the author of Amusing Ourselves to Death chronicles our transformation into a Technopoly: a society that no longer merely uses technology as a support system but instead is shaped by it...

Paradigms Regained
Hlynka, D., & Belland, J.C. (1991)

When education (teaching and/or learning) is considered to be an art, then it seems obvious that the methods of artistic inquiry would be appropriate analysis techniques. Such analysis seems rare or non-existent in educational technology....

Education policy
Beynon, J., & Mackay, H. (1989)

The starting point for this paper is that the use and discussion of information technology (IT) in education is uncritical. The dominant emphasis is on more being inherently better; and questions about the relationship of the technology to...

Information Technology: A Luddite Analysis
Webster, F., & Robins, K. (1986)

Drawing widely on sociological, economic, and political theory cominbined with detailed attention to technical, business, and sociological evidence, this critical scholarly work offers a comprehensive analysis both of the significance of...

Teachers and machines: The Classroom Use of Technology Since 1920
Cuban, L (1986)

The adoption and the effectiveness of game-based learning depend largely on the acceptance by classroom teachers, as they can be considered the true change agents of the schools. Therefore, we need to understand teachers' perceptions and beliefs...

The Whale and the Reactor: A search for limits in an age of hightechnology
Winner, L. (1986)

Langdon Winner has made a name for himself as something of a neo-Luddite or technophobe. But I prefer to think of him as a public historian who raises the very questions many of us are reluctant to ask about new information technologies. This far...

Autonomous Technology: Technics-Out-Of-Control as a Theme in Political Thought
Winner, L. (1977)

The truth of the matter is that our deficiency does not lie in the want of well-verified "facts." What we lack is our bearings. The contemporary experience of things technological has repeatedly confounded our vision, our expectations, and our...

Pages